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21st October 2017
New Screens Show Off Captain Ginyu, Nappa, And Story Details

New Screens Show Off Captain Ginyu, Nappa, And Story Details

Bandai Namco offered up a huge collection of Dragon Ball FighterZ screens this morning showing off new characters, online modes, story details, and more.

We've divided up the collection images into different sections of the story so follow the links for Captain Ginyu screens, Nappa screens, and story screens. First up, is Cpatain Ginyu.

Here is Captain Ginyu on his own.

And here he is with the Ginyu Force, who can assist him in battle.

That must be the Recoome boom.

Ginyu is also apparently able to body-swap with his opponents.

Captain Ginyu | Nappa | Story | Additional Screens

For more from our month of Dragon Ball coverage, including new details for FighterZ, click the banner below.

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20th October 2017
The Promising Multiplayer Is Held Back By An Uninspiring Setting

The Promising Multiplayer Is Held Back By An Uninspiring Setting

Game of Thrones is getting in on the mobile craze with Conquest, the newest in the ever-growing lineup of Game of War-style games. 

If you haven’t played Game of War, the concept is simple: Start a castle (a ‘house,’ in Conquest), build and upgrade military and resource plots (ad infinitum), build military units, create or join an allegiance, and pillage those weaker than your allegiance until they flee or join your side. While this sounds exciting on paper, in both Game of War and Conquest this is all done through an often boring system of clicking and waiting. Upgrading buildings takes a few minutes in the beginning of the game, but upgrades soon take hours to complete. If you want to attack your neighbor, you click attack on their keep, select which units you want to attack with, then wait. Then, if you damaged their wall and kept most of your soldiers, you can attack again. Repeat until their wall is destroyed and pillage their resources.

Allegiances help make pillaging quicker, thankfully. Working as a team, an allegiance of players can destroy a wall quicker than a lone player. To start an allegiance, you must find someone willing to be your Bannerman. Each allegiance owner can have up to five Bannermen, with each of them having five as well, all the way down to fourth-tier Bannermen, who cannot have any of their own. This allegiance system is a good way of keeping straight who is in charge and passing orders down a chain of command. Unfortunately, it also requires asking strangers to bend the knee if they want to team up with you. This can be fun if you’re powerful enough to be a threat, or it can be frustrating if you’re being harassed by an allegiance wanting you to kneel.

Allegiances fight over Seats of Power such as Winterfell and Casterly Rock. These seats of varying power (King’s Landing is the hardest to take but gives the most benefits) are mostly inactive in the preview build of the game, but allegiances can take active ones, for glory and the tangible benefits they bequeath members of the allegiance, such as increased march speed or resource collection.

The setting and characters you’re surrounded by in a game can make or break the experience. Unfortunately, Conquest’s setting fails to put my mind in the Game of Thrones universe. It feels more classically medieval than Game of Thrones-inspired. My castle only features one building distinctly from Game of Thrones, the Maester's tower, which can be used to research upgrades. The upgrades in the Maester’s Tower, which fall under one of four categories (military, city defense, logistics, and economy), go back to having no relation to the universe, however helpful they are gameplay-wise.

Conquest does feature some of the series’ most popular characters, but they don’t feel like those characters. They mostly pop up in a microtransaction advertisement or to teach a new mechanic, but with no voice acting and written dialogue that breaks the fourth wall more than it tries to stay in-universe, there’s very little connection between the characters in Conquest and the characters on HBO or in the books.

From renting extra workers or Maesters to work on more buildings and research, to buying packs of boosts and currency, microtransactions are hard to avoid in Conquest. What’s most tempting to buy are speedups, which allow you to finish construction, research, or train troops faster. Instead of waiting an hour for a farm to upgrade, a speedup can upgrade it immediately so you can get started working on something else. These speedups are given away for free occasionally, but those who spend money will be able to progress through the ranks much faster than those who try the free-to-play route.

Game of Thrones fans should temper their expectations before diving in, as the game released yesterday, October 19. The setting and characters offer nods to the broader fiction, but what I experienced in the preview version of the game is mostly rooted in a familiar and established mobile game structure. Fighting over Westeros’ Seats of Power with an organized allegiance might fulfil some people’s fantasies, but the fear of microtransactions deciding the fate of those Seats is real. If the game ever manages to capture that Game of Thrones feel however, it has a chance to suck a lot of people in.

19th October 2017
Hands-On With Star Wars Battlefront II's Single-Player Campaign

Hands-On With Star Wars Battlefront II’s Single-Player Campaign

Few series have lineages as storied as Star Wars, which can be a burden for every new project that attempts to pull from its universe. For decades, Star Wars games have tried to retell the stories from the movies or diversify and explore the outside periphery of the galaxy far, far away. The story campaign of Star Wars Battlefront II charts a middle ground between the two, teetering on the edge of the movies we know and love without being directly involved.

The last Battlefront game that released in 2015 alongside The Force Awakens was a multiplayer-only affair that focused on back-and-forth battles across Star Wars history. However, one of the major complaints from fans was the lack of a single-player campaign, prompting EA to bring a high-budget campaign for the sequel.

Developed by EA Motive, the studio headed by former Assassin’s Creed producer Jade Raymond, the campaign puts the player in the shoes of Iden Versio. As a lifelong servant of the Empire, she has dedicated to the cause of wiping out the Rebel Alliance as commander of the Inferno Team. When the game starts, Iden is captured by the enemy and has to remotely control her backpack droid to free her. From there, she’s one blaster rifle and a hundred Rebels away from escaping the ship.

The prologue mission introduces you to all the basic game mechanics. Iden can use her droid to zap enemies into unconsciousness, which is good for stealth approaches. This skill requires a cooldown that can be lessened by killing enemies or making headshots, so Iden can’t avoid fighting for long.

After she makes her escape from the rebel frigate, Iden meets with her team to discuss the Empire’s counter-offensive on Endor. The then game leaps into the future to the forest moon just before the climactic moment where the Millennium Falcon blows up the Death Star as Iden and the rest of the Inferno Team try to fight their way back to their command post. Interestingly, some of the firefights here can be skipped, if you are feeling too moral to shoot some celebrating Rebels from the grassy knoll.

While the larger space of Endor does not quite have a Halo-like quality of tackling encounters any way you see fit, there is a lot less linearity to the level design than in the cramped hallways of the prologue chapter. You can sneak around the enemy, attack from behind, or lead a group of pursuers into a small enough space where you can take them all out with a grenade.

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Iden commandeers a TIE Fighter and heads into space, looking for her Admiral and father to reconvene. She finds his ship being bombarded by Y-Wings, forcing her into a space battle. The full space battles lack the strategic element of 1994’s TIE Fighter, but they are as fast and frantic as you would hope. Chasing an X-Wing through the remains of exploded Death Star as you both weave through debris is exciting and leaves you gasping at every near miss.

The chapter ends with Iden receiving posthumous orders from the Emperor, who left one final mission for his subordinates and was maybe better at predicting the future than people gave him credit for. The goals of the mission aren’t clear, but the objectives are, and Iden is more than willing to rebuild the empire that she believes is a force of good in the world.

The third chapter starts with a slightly more involved space battle, allowing Iden to dock into enemy ships, shoot up their bay, and then proceed to their main computers on foot.

Battlefront II’s story campaign is likely the best Star Wars has ever looked in video game form. During some moments I squinted and was unable to tell the difference between the game’s cutscenes and the movies themselves. Space battles are visual treats, and I occasionally found myself being so distracted by what I saw that I crashed into the broad side of a Star Destroyer.

I ultimately walked away from Battlefront II wanting to play more of the campaign, but also hoping that the rest of it becomes more interesting. I worry that Iden’s story will follow too many familiar tropes of confusion, redemption, and eventually rebellion, which would be disappointing if it does not subvert expectations. The gaming landscape has had Titanfall II and Doom’s campaigns since the last Battlefront released, so Battlefront II's campaign has big shoes to fill if it wants to impress when it releases on November 17.

17th October 2017
Join The Resistance In The Launch Trailer For Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus

Join The Resistance In The Launch Trailer For Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus

The launch trailer for Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus is out, presenting the option "German...or else!" We'll take the latter, thank you very much, and so will many others.

The trailer's Nazi killing looks like a fun proposition, and be sure to stick around until the end when Hitler himself presents himself as an attractive target.

The game comes out on October 27 for PS4, Xbox One, and PC.

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17th October 2017
Trailer Promises 'This Isn't The Alola You Thought You Knew'

Trailer Promises ‘This Isn’t The Alola You Thought You Knew’

The latest trailer for Pokémon Ultra Sun & Ultra Moon outlines a looming battle between darkness and light.

Along with its good versus evil allegory, the trailer also reveals new Pokémon you can ride (was that Solgaleo?), what appears to be a Star Fox-style flying sequence (was that Lunala?), as well as a promise that, "This isn't the Alola you thought you knew."

Pokémon Ultra Sun & Ultra Moon are coming to 3DS on November 17.

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For more on Pokémon Ultra Sun & Ultra Moon head here. To read a recent opinion piece about what Andrew Reiner wants from the future of Pokémon, head here.

15th October 2017
Comical Live Action Trailer Invites You To Reassemble Your Squad

Comical Live Action Trailer Invites You To Reassemble Your Squad

Activision released three new trailers today for the upcoming Call of Duty: WWII. Instead of teasing in-game footage or revealing a cinematic trailer, the video is a lighthearted live action trailer that invites players to reassemble their group of friends to prepare for the game's release.

Three teasers were revealed for different regions: US, France, and UK. Each are slightly different with varying actors, but all have a similar amusing tone and message. You can view them all below:

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For more on Call of Duty: WWII, you can take a look at our cover story hub that includes exclusive videos, interviews, and more. Call of Duty: WWII releases on November 3 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC.

13th October 2017
Shuhei Yoshida And Other Executives Reflect On The Series 20 Years Later

Shuhei Yoshida And Other Executives Reflect On The Series 20 Years Later

Sony and Polyphony Digital are celebrating Gran Turismo’s 20th birthday a few months early in preparation for the launch of Gran Turismo Sport next week.

A video released today features executives from Polyphony and Sony explaining a bit of the history of the series and what it’s been like to work on the games. President of Sony Worldwide Studios Shuhei Yoshida also explains how Polyphony CEO Kazunori Yamauchi’s always optimistic attitude encouraged the team during the development of the original Gran Turismo.

There are a lot of interesting quotes about the series’ development and how it’s changed over the years, including tidbits about the scale of Gran Turismo Sport and the effort that has gone into developing it. Be sure to check out the video below.

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12th October 2017
Cosmo The Spacedog Sets Up The Story In New Trailer

Cosmo The Spacedog Sets Up The Story In New Trailer

Even though it's typically obscured beneath a haze of slapstick and rubber-duck jokes, TT Games' Lego titles do actually contain narrative strings that tie the experiences together. Really! If you don't believe us, a new trailer for Lego Marvel Super Heroes 2 will certainly dismantle your skepticism. It highlights the main conflict between a massive roster of heroes and their time-travelling foe, Kang the Conqueror. Also, it's narrated by Cosmo The Spacedog, who is a good boy.

You may recognize the voice of Kang the Conqueror, too. Actor Peter Serafinowicz, who plays TheTick on Amazon's The Tick voices the villain.

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Warner Interactive revealed a slew of characters at New York Comic Con, too. They include: Grandmaster (Thor: Ragnarok), Valkyrie (Thor: Ragnarok), Arizona Annie, Blade, Captain Avalon, Charlie-27, Chipmunk Hunk, Dormammu, Ghost Rider & Hell Cycle, Hellcow, Hobgoblin, Hulk 2099, Koi Boi, Lady Spider, Luke Cage, Misty Knight, Morbius, Phantom Rider, Red Wolf, Living Totem, Squirrel Girl, Super Adaptoid, and Ursa Major.

Players can expand the roster further by purchasing either the $14.99 season pass or the game's deluxe edition, which will add 60 additional characters and six levels. The levels are based on Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, Black Panther, Avengers: Infinity War, Ant-Man and The Wasp, Cloak & Dagger, and The Runaways

Lego Marvel Super Heroes 2 is coming to PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and PC on November 14.

12th October 2017
Need For Speed Payback's Sweet Revenge Story Trailer

Need For Speed Payback’s Sweet Revenge Story Trailer

When The House – a syndicate controlling Need For Speed Payback's Fortune Valley – goes after Tyler, he assembles a crew and hits back.

Take to the streets, win races and earn respect, and go on set-piece missions to take down the organization.

For more on the game, check out Jeff's hands-on impressions from Gamescom.

Need for Speed Payback is out November 10 on PS4, Xbox One, and PC.

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