For you Xbox One players out there, here’s where you’ll find all the news, reviews and gossip for the latest Xbox One games and accessories.

14th December 2017
Rare Details Trading Companies And Player Progression System

Rare Details Trading Companies And Player Progression System

The world of Sea of Thieves has players sailing the high seas and collecting booty, but the game is about connecting with friends, and Rare makes that clear in its newest developer video.

In a recent design video, Design Director Mike Chapman says the company isn’t looking to wall players off from each other with disruptive power progression mechanics, “We wanted to build a game where the value of sharing a rich and diverse world with other players is much more meaningful than ever increasing stats."

To do this, Rare doesn’t have any barriers preventing players of different levels from playing together. Players can purchase voyages, or quests, and then all crewmembers vote on which of their voyages they want to tackle together. Majority wins in Sea of Thieves’ voting system, so no random drawing from player choices here. This system allows players who have advanced in the game to go on voyages even with the newest of players.

Voyages are sold by a number of trading companies found in outposts throughout the world, and will award gold, titles, ranks, and cosmetic items to those skillful enough to complete them. These rewards, which are split evenly across a crew, are a part of Sea of Thieves' progression system. Players can unlock customization options and show off to friends by completing voyages, but the company isn't ready to go into much detail about other ways to unlock rewards, such as microtransactions.

"We’re currently focusing on talking about our progression systems, the trading companies and the goal of becoming a Pirate Legend," says executive producer Joe Neate. "We will talk about our business model early in the new year."

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The trading companies each have different focuses, such as the Gold Hoarders’ desire for treasure. This trading company has a stash of keys, and will pay players to help them find the chests that belong to them, or may send them to solve riddles that require knowledge of the world’s islands.

The Merchant Alliance Trading Company desires to control trade in the sea, and will pay pirates to transport items ranging from wild animals to explosive barrels. There are a number of challenges facing pirates as they try to ferry these resources, such as lightning, leaky ships, time limits, and other pirates who may want to steal the cargo.

The last trading company Rare talks about is The Order of Souls, whose members can capture magic from the skulls of fallen pirates, and are happy to reward those who bring the skulls to them. This trading company’s voyages are more combat oriented, pitting players against skeleton crews (literal skeletons, not ships with few enemies), or sending them to attack one of the world’s many forts.

Players can rank up in each of these trading companies by purchasing and completing voyages offered by them. The more of the trading company’s voyages you complete, the more difficult and rewarding the offered voyages become. Eventually, players will achieve the status of Pirate Legend and have access to new voyages and rewards.

Rare is really focusing on player cooperation with Sea of Thieves, so it’s nice to know I’ll never be blocked from playing with my friends, no matter how far ahead (or behind) I get in the game. You can look forward to sailing the high seas with your friends on Xbox One and PC March 20, but in the meantime check out how Rare went about starting work on Sea of Thieves, and how feedback and data from the alpha tests changed the course of the game.

14th December 2017
Grab Destiny 2 for £20, Snag Nintendo Switch With Two Games for £319

Grab Destiny 2 for £20, Snag Nintendo Switch With Two Games for £319

Get PS4 Pro with Gran Turismo and 12-month PS subscribtion for £299, £13,000 off 77-Inch LG 4K TV, save up to £158 on Asus gaming monitors
13th December 2017
Daily Deals: PSVR Gran Turismo Bundle, Destiny 2, and Apple iTunes Gift Cards

Daily Deals: PSVR Gran Turismo Bundle, Destiny 2, and Apple iTunes Gift Cards

Holiday Deals on Destiny, Battlefront, Wolfenstein, South Park, Blu-ray Movies, TVs, Laptops, and More
13th December 2017
Snag Nintendo Switch With Two Games for £319

Snag Nintendo Switch With Two Games for £319

Get an iPhone 8 Plus 64 GB for £759, save £80 off an Apple Watch Series 3, snag £40 off Logitech G430 gaming headset.
12th December 2017
New Gameplay Today – PUBG On Xbox One X

New Gameplay Today – PUBG On Xbox One X

PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds is now available on Xbox One as part of Microsoft's Game Preview program. We loaded it up on an Xbox One X to see how the wildly popular PC game holds up on console. Can Leo survive to become the sole survivor? Dan Tack and I watch with bated breath to see how long he lasts – and whether the game's worth checking out on Xbox One.

As you'll immediately see, the framerate ain't so great on Xbox One X, even with the console's additional horsepower. That doesn't mean that the game's a bust. The gameplay is identical, even if you're using a gamepad instead of a keyboard and mouse. That seems to be a little bit of a sticking point for Our Hero Leo, as you can see in the video below. But don't count him out just yet...

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12th December 2017
Daily Deals: $50 Off PS4 Pro With Video Game Trade-In

Daily Deals: $50 Off PS4 Pro With Video Game Trade-In

1-Year PS Plus for $39.99, $5 Off Print Books $15 or More on Amazon, Nintendo Switch AC Adapter on Sale, Killer Inspiron 13 2-in-1 Laptop Deal, and More
12th December 2017
GTA Online Seems to Include Red Dead Redemption 2 Items

GTA Online Seems to Include Red Dead Redemption 2 Items

A revolver found in The Doomsday Heist can seemingly be unlocked in both GTA and Red Dead 2.
12th December 2017
Unpolished Platforming Bliss

Unpolished Platforming Bliss

A Hat in Time represents the best kind of Kickstarter project. Developer Gears for Breakfast doesn’t have any notable celebrity developers on its team and was instead able to reach its monetary goals based purely on the potential of the game and its appreciation for the genre it was trying to emulate. The result is a game that lacks polish, but A Hat in Time is full of surprises, and, more importantly, is a blast to play.

A Hat in Time begins with a mysterious girl in a tall hat flying through space in a ship fueled by magical hourglasses. She is sidetracked, however, when a bad guy from Mafia Town (a planet inhabited exclusively by Mafioso) invades her ship and her hourglasses are flung into space, making their way to the neighboring planets. What follows is a bizarre platforming adventure through a number of distinct worlds with an assortment of fun abilities.

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Arguably Hat in Time’s best and most notable element is its platforming gameplay. Moving the unnamed girl through the world is fast and accurate. I rarely, if ever, missed a jump I wasn’t aiming for, and moved at a pace that would impress even Mario. Navigating the environments is simply fun, and when you get into the rhythm of sprinting, double-jumping, lunging, and jumping again, you end up with a fantastic sense of control over your movement that makes even the smallest platform easily accessible.

Platforming is far from your only activity, however. While plenty of jumping challenges are available, A Hat in time does a good job of mixing things up with levels and sequences that defy your initial expectations. One level on a train that plays out like a stealth game (complete with overt Metal Gear Solid references) requires you to solve a murder mystery and dodge vision cones, and it ended up being one of my favorite sections of the game. Another level takes place on a scary planet full of dark woods, requiring you to sign multiple contracts with a pushy demon in order to take on side-quests. These kinds of unexpected moments happen throughout the game, making each new location worth seeking out.

Your character is also able to unlock a collection of abilities tied to different hats, like one that turns her into an ice statue to slam down on springy platforms and launch across levels. These upgrades are all useful, and can be accentuated by a series of unlockable patches that improve them. Switching between abilities is instantaneous, which adds to the impressive platforming flow when you have to use multiple abilities in quick succession.

A Hat in Time has a lot of character in all facets of its art design, but there is no escaping that the visuals are dated. The game looks like an HD remaster of an early 2000s platformer. While your character’s movements and actions look great, many of the other characters move with stilted animation, and their models clip into themselves in awkward ways. The result is a game that feels a little sloppy. It’s far from broken, but I did run into the occasional distracting bug, like when my character’s hood was offset about halfway up her face during the final cutscene.

A Hat in Time lacks polish, but it makes up for its shortcomings with excellent platforming and a universe I was happy to be part of. The whole experience is adorable, and in many ways it improves on the very platformers it uses as inspiration.

11th December 2017
Daily Deals: Green Monday Is Better Than Black Friday

Daily Deals: Green Monday Is Better Than Black Friday

20% off PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds for Xbox One (Out Tomorrow), 1yr PS Plus for $39.99, PSVR Gran Turismo Sport Bundle for $199.99, Planet of the Apes Blu-ray Trilogy for $18, and more